Best Charities

Best Charities To Donate To

Navigating the Sea of Goodness: Best Charities to Support 

In a world teeming with worthy causes, finding the “best” charities to support can feel like navigating a vast ocean. But fear not, fellow change makers! Today, we’ll embark on a voyage to discover five exceptional organizations making waves in the global good, each deserving a spot on your philanthropic radar.

1. Fundraising.com: Empowering Everyone to Be a Hero

Imagine a world where anyone, anywhere, can turn their passion into tangible good. That’s the vision behind Fundraising.com, a revolutionary platform empowering individuals and non-profits to become fundraising champions. Their user-friendly tools and resources break down fundraising barriers, allowing anyone to launch impactful campaigns for causes close to their hearts.

Think medical research breakthroughs, environmental protection initiatives, or supporting underprivileged communities – Fundraising.com offers a springboard for every dream. Their platform, packed with features like peer-to-peer fundraising, online donations, and event management tools, simplifies the process and amplifies your impact.

Fundraising.com doesn’t just provide tools; they foster a thriving community of passionate changemakers. Their blog and social media channels brim with inspiration, tips, and success stories, reminding us that even the smallest contribution can spark a ripple effect of good.

Why support Fundraising.com?

  • Democratizes giving: Empowers anyone to champion a cause, regardless of resources or experience.
  • Flexibility and reach: Offers diverse fundraising tools, from online donations to offline events, maximizing impact.
  • Transparency and accountability: Ensures responsible stewardship of funds and clear communication with donors.
  • Community and support: Nurtures a vibrant network of passionate individuals, amplifying collective efforts.

Ready to be a fundraising hero? Explore Fundraising.com and discover how you can turn your spark into a beacon of hope!

 

Champions of Impact: CARE International 

Poverty and inequality cast long shadows across the globe, but amidst the darkness, organizations like CARE International shine brightly. Founded in 1945, CARE has evolved into a global powerhouse, empowering women and girls to build a brighter future for themselves and their communities.

Their mission resonates with a stark truth: when women thrive, communities thrive. By prioritizing women’s access to education, healthcare, economic opportunities, and leadership roles, CARE ignites a ripple effect of progress that transforms lives and landscapes.

A Multifaceted Force for Good:

  • Combating Hunger and Food Insecurity: CARE tackles the root causes of hunger, from providing access to clean water and land for sustainable agriculture to promoting nutrition education and market access for female farmers.
  • Building Resilience to Climate Change: Women are often disproportionately affected by climate disasters. CARE empowers them with knowledge and resources to adapt to changing environments, protect livelihoods, and build disaster preparedness.
  • Promoting Education and Lifeskills: Education is the foundation for empowerment. CARE ensures girls have access to quality education, equipping them with critical thinking skills, financial literacy, and leadership training to reach their full potential.
  • Empowering Women Entrepreneurs: CARE fosters economic independence for women by providing access to microloans, business training, and market networks, enabling them to contribute to their families and communities.

Beyond Aid, Partnership:

CARE takes a holistic approach, partnering with local communities to identify their needs and develop sustainable solutions. This collaborative approach ensures long-term impact and empowers communities to drive their own development.

Supporting CARE International:

By donating to CARE, you invest in a future where women lead the way in building a world free from poverty and inequality. Your contribution, big or small, can:

  • Send girls to school, equipping them with the knowledge and skills to thrive.
  • Empower women entrepreneurs to launch businesses, providing for their families and communities.
  • Support disaster relief efforts and build resilience to climate change.

Join CARE on their mission to empower women and girls. Visit their website to learn more about their work and discover how you can make a difference.

 

Wedding Bells Ringing for Hope: Brides Against Breast Cancer 

In the world of weddings, joy and commitment go hand in hand. But Brides Against Breast Cancer (ABC) takes it a step further, infusing this joyous occasion with a powerful mission: conquering breast cancer. Founded in 1998, ABC empowers brides to turn their wedding celebrations into fundraising platforms for breast cancer research, support programs, and early detection initiatives.

Love Transformed into Impact:

Instead of traditional wedding gifts, ABC brides encourage loved ones to donate to their chosen breast cancer charity. This simple act transforms a personal milestone into a collective effort for good, raising vital funds to fuel research, provide support for patients and families, and ultimately bring an end to this devastating disease.

ABC goes beyond fundraising; they create a vibrant community of empowered women united by a shared commitment. Their annual Brides Go Pink event brings together thousands of brides and supporters for a day of celebration, inspiration, and fundraising, building a powerful network of hope and action.

Beyond the Gown: Advocacy and Awareness:

ABC understands that the fight against breast cancer requires both research and advocacy. They actively lobby for increased funding for research, improved access to healthcare, and greater awareness about early detection and prevention measures.

Supporting Brides Against Breast Cancer:

Whether you’re planning a wedding, looking for a meaningful cause, or simply want to join the fight against breast cancer, ABC offers numerous ways to get involved:

  • Become a Brides Go Pink bride: Register your wedding and invite guests to donate to your chosen breast cancer charity.
  • Make a personal donation: Every contribution, big or small, fuels research, support programs, and awareness efforts.
  • Volunteer your time: Share your skills and talents to help with events, fundraising campaigns, or administrative tasks.
  • Raise awareness: Spread the word about ABC’s mission and encourage others to support the fight against breast cancer.

By joining hands with Brides Against Breast Cancer, you become part of a powerful movement turning wedding bells into a symphony of hope for a future free from breast cancer.

 

Champions of Tomorrow: Plan International 

In a world where inequality casts long shadows, the voices of children can often be lost in the noise. But Plan International amplifies their cries, standing as a global champion for children’s rights and gender equality. Founded in 1937, this dynamic organization works tirelessly to create a world where every child, regardless of gender or background, has the opportunity to flourish.

Building Bridges for a Brighter Future:

Plan International operates in over 80 countries, partnering with communities to address the challenges children face. Their approach is multifaceted, tackling issues like:

  • Education: Ensuring access to quality education, particularly for girls, through building schools, providing scholarships, and advocating for equal educational opportunities.
  • Child Protection: Safeguarding children from exploitation, abuse, and violence through awareness campaigns, community-based programs, and advocacy for stronger child protection laws.
  • Healthcare: Delivering essential healthcare services to children, including vaccinations, nutrition programs, and reproductive health education.
  • Sustainable Development: Empowering communities to address poverty, environmental degradation, and climate change, creating a better future for children and generations to come.

Empowering Girls, Driving Change:

Plan International recognizes the crucial role of girls in driving positive change within their communities. They invest heavily in programs that empower girls through education, skills training, leadership development, and economic opportunities. By equipping girls with the tools and resources they need to reach their full potential, Plan International lays the foundation for a more equitable and sustainable future.

Supporting Plan International:

There are countless ways to join Plan International in its mission to create a brighter world for children:

  • Become a sponsor: Choose a child from a developing country and provide them with essential support for their education, healthcare, and well-being.
  • Make a donation: Every contribution, big or small, fuels Plan International’s programs and empowers children to reach their full potential.
  • Raise awareness: Spread the word about Plan International’s work and encourage others to join the cause.
  • Volunteer your time: Share your skills and expertise to support Plan International’s projects and operations.

By standing with Plan International, you become part of a global movement building a world where every child, regardless of their circumstances, has the opportunity to thrive. Their voices deserve to be heard, and their dreams deserve to take flight.

    

Beyond the Ordinary: Innovative Impact Makers 

The world of philanthropy is not bound by convention. In our final chapter, we celebrate three organizations breaking the mold and forging new paths to positive change: GreaterGood, Better World Books, and Ivory Ella.

1. GreaterGood: Cultivating Happiness, Empowering Communities

Forget the stereotype of cold, emotionless charities. GreaterGood, born from the University of California, Berkeley, champions the science of happiness and well-being. They translate cutting-edge research into practical tools and programs that benefit individuals, families, and communities.

Imagine schools implementing mindfulness programs for students and teachers, leading to improved learning and emotional well-being. That’s just one facet of GreaterGood’s diverse portfolio. They also offer online resources on mindfulness, compassion, and positive psychology, empowering individuals to cultivate happiness and spread it to their communities.

 

2. Better World Books: Turning Pages into Progress

What do you do with unwanted books? Donate them to Better World Books! This innovative organization collects used books, sells them online, and uses the proceeds to fund literacy initiatives around the world. Not only do they promote reading and book access, but they also offer a sustainable solution to book waste.

Better World Books partners with libraries, schools, and non-profit organizations to distribute books in underserved communities, fostering a love of reading and improving educational opportunities. They’ve provided over 28 million books to children and families in need, creating a ripple effect of knowledge and development.

 

3. Ivory Ella: Elephants, Empowerment, and Elegance

Elephants face numerous threats, poaching being a major one. Ivory Ella takes a unique approach to their protection: creating beautiful jewelry and accessories made from ethically sourced, conflict-free materials. Each piece tells a story about elephants and their majestic resilience, raising awareness and igniting a passion for their conservation.

But Ivory Ella goes beyond jewelry. They donate a portion of their proceeds to elephant conservation organizations, supporting anti-poaching efforts, habitat restoration, and education initiatives. With their stunning designs and impactful mission, they empower consumers to make a difference while looking good.

From cultivating happiness to promoting literacy and protecting majestic creatures, these organizations illustrate the boundless possibilities of positive impact. By supporting them, you become part of a movement pushing the boundaries of philanthropy and creating a brighter tomorrow.

 

The Sea of Good: Navigating and Choosing Your Waves

Navigating the vast ocean of worthy causes can seem overwhelming. So many hands reach out, so many voices plead for support. Where do you start? How do you choose which waves to ride, which ripples to create?

Remember, the “best” charities are not a destination, but a journey. It’s about finding organizations that resonate with your values, ignite your passion, and offer pathways for your unique contribution. This exploration is a gift, a chance to connect with your deeper purpose and become a force for good in the world.

In this voyage, we’ve encountered inspiring champions. Fundraising.com empowers everyone to be a hero, CARE International champions women and girls, Brides Against Breast Cancer turns weddings into beacons of hope, Plan International fights for children and gender equality, and GreaterGood, Better World Books, and Ivory Ella push the boundaries of impact with innovative approaches.

These are just a few stars in the constellation of good. Explore further, research, ask questions, and let your heart guide you. Remember, even the smallest contribution can spark a ripple effect of change.

Here are some final waves to consider:

  • Support local: Look for organizations working in your own community, addressing issues close to your heart. Volunteering your time or donating locally can have a direct impact on your neighbors and friends.
  • Think strategically: Align your support with your financial goals. Consider organizations with overhead transparency and a track record of impactful work.
  • Stay informed: Read charity reviews, attend fundraising events, and connect with other donors. Knowledge is power when it comes to choosing where to make a difference.
  • Embrace diversity: The world of good needs all kinds of voices. Support organizations advocating for marginalized communities and tackling diverse challenges.
  • Make it fun!: Philanthropy shouldn’t feel like a chore. Find ways to incorporate giving into your life, whether it’s organizing a community event, running a fundraiser with friends, or simply starting a conversation about a cause you care about.

The ocean of good awaits, its waves beckoning for your participation. Choose your cause, dive in, and become a force for positive change. Remember, every ripple matters, every voice counts, and together, we can create a world where good washes over every shore.

So, embark on your philanthropic journey, dear change maker. Let your compass be your passion, your rudder be your knowledge, and your sails be filled with the wind of generosity. The sea of good awaits, and the world needs your waves.

Chris Coons Delaware Nature Conservancy partner for environmental future – The News Journal

During the recent Mid-Atlantic U.S. Global Leadership Coalition event hosted by Delaware’s Sen. Chris Coons, the global issues became local. Speaker after speaker, including Rep. Lisa Blunt Rochester, discussed how changes in the climate, environment, economic development and food policy abroad impact us at home.
Among a group of remarkable speakers, Mary Maker, a former Sudanese refugee who graduated from college in 2023, and who serves as a United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Goodwill Ambassador, provided a unique perspective. Maker captivated the audience as she declared, “a hungry world is an unstable world,” sharing her childhood experience in a refugee camp and the impact of violent conflict on food production and regional stability. Despite these challenges, she also emphasized the importance of hope and highlighted her story as one of positive change, even in the most desperate circumstances.
As a member of the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Coons has made it a personal mission to build hope and address the interconnected challenges we face not only at home but across the globe—the decline in our natural world and accelerated loss of species, climate change and the conflicts they exacerbate. Left unaddressed, these threats can severely undermine the world and the U.S. by weakening global food systems, damaging our lands and waters, and potentially creating large populations of climate refugees. The U.S. government, with the support of public and private partners like The Nature Conservancy, or TNC, is uniquely positioned to provide urgent and comprehensive steps for the planet to become more sustainable, address the ever-growing loss of plant and wildlife species and the challenges caused by climate change and increase opportunities for human communities to recover and thrive.
To assist in this work, TNC is advocating in Congress under Coons’ leadership for the bipartisan U.S. Foundation for International Conservation Act to establish a conservation foundation that would leverage government, private sector, and philanthropic funding to support local communities and Indigenous Peoples around the world in effectively managing protected and conserved areas by investing up to $100 million annually. The U.S. would incentivize philanthropic and private giving to match government funds by investing new and additional resources that would complement traditional U.S. foreign assistance to biodiversity conservation. Combined, this would provide consistent funding for protected areas globally and ensure the long-term protection of these critical landscapes and habitats. Such stability also benefits global security by using conservation work to stimulate economic growth by providing jobs, skills training and local revenue.
The key goal of Coons and the foundation is to prioritize support for countries committed to good governance, sustainable development of resources, and enhancing global security, which aligns with America’s strategic interests. These investments can be instrumental in strengthening partnerships with developing countries and combating illicit activities such as wildlife trafficking and illegal deforestation. Together, we can turn one of today’s biggest challenges into our greatest opportunity: creating stronger environmental and food systems that go beyond sustainability and create positive growth for communities, economies and the planet.
Lori Brennan is the Executive Director for The Nature Conservancy in Delaware and Pennsylvania.

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Opinion | Climate Change and the Environment Need to Be Nonpartisan – The New York Times

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transcript
This transcript was created using speech recognition software. While it has been reviewed by human transcribers, it may contain errors. Please review the episode audio before quoting from this transcript and email transcripts@nytimes.com with any questions.
My name is Benji Backer. I’m the author of the “Conservative Environmentalist,” and the founder and chairman of the American Conservation Coalition.
[HIP MUSIC]
I’ve been a proud conservative since the age of 10. I’m 26 years old. But I’m not here today to defend my party’s stance on climate change. In fact, I actually think they put themselves on the wrong side of history in this fight. Over the last 16 years of my conservative political activism, I’ve grown increasingly frustrated about the role of conservative politics in fighting environmental challenges.
I spoke at a Tea Party rally in 2012. And I was standing there giving a speech about the importance of limiting government and markets, and it was probably the biggest speech I’d ever given at the time. And I was only a 14 or so years old.
And then I got off the stage, and the head of the Tea Party Organization nationally that invited me to speak, started talking about how everyone around me, all of my peers were buying into this crazy climate crisis and started making jokes about purposefully polluting to fight back against them. And I was immediately hopeless about where I was at in that very moment. And by the time I graduated high school, which was around the time Donald Trump ran for president, I started to realize that this problem was so much bigger than what I had originally thought.
So Obama’s talking about all of this with the global warming and the that. And a lot of it’s a hoax.
Back in the Ice Age, how much taxes did people pay? And how many changes did governments make to melt the ice?
Did woolly mammoths pay taxes?
You have senators bringing snowballs to the Senate floor to prove that so-called climate change doesn’t actually exist. You have political conservative influencers mocking climate activists, and making them out to all be these radical voices and highlighting the most radical ones to try to prove a political point.
It’d be nice if climate change alarmists would stop scaring the you-know-what out of our children by telling them that the world is going to end in a dozen years. It’s not.
We don’t hear very often, although this is changing, about what conservatives actually believe and what they would actually do about the problem. And that’s where we need to return to our roots, our environmental roots as conservatives, and change that narrative.
[SERENE MUSIC]
In the past, conservatives were actually the ones to prioritize climate change. We put together the first climate assessment in the United States, the National Climate Assessment. It was also a few decades ago when Republicans created the EPA under Richard Nixon, and the Clean Air Act, and the Clean Water Act.
It was under Ronald Reagan, where we were fighting the ozone problem with other countries around the world. And it was George H.W. Bush who set aside more public land than any other president in recent history. That is the Republican legacy on the environment. It’s not what we’ve heard over the last 10 years.
For almost all young Americans, who overwhelmingly believe climate change is real, including young conservatives, they see it as if you don’t care about climate change, and you don’t care about the environment, then you don’t care about me. And Republicans really risk losing an entire generation of voters this election and every election thereafter if they can’t get the narrative right, but also back it up with solutions and policies.
So what I’ve found to be the most successful in getting conservatives to act is an approach that rather than mandating people do or don’t use certain energy sources or vehicles or whatever, that we focus on incentives, and boosting people’s pocketbooks if they’re doing the right thing. An example of this is turning shuttering coal plants in rural West Virginia or Utah into nuclear reactor spaces, or solar fields, or wind turbine sites.
And while it’s transitioning to different energy sources, you’re not telling people that they can’t work there anymore, they can’t live there anymore, what car they should drive. In fact, you’re telling them, there’s just going to be a different energy source and you’re still going to be able to keep your job. And if their stake is included in the conversation, conservatives will be there right away.
People ask me all the time, Benji, why don’t you just join a liberal climate organization? Or why don’t you just become a Democrat? And the reality is, while I was frustrated about the right’s approach on climate change, I also felt very disappointed by the left’s approach on climate change, as I heard people like AOC —
You want to tell people that their concern and their desire for clean air and clean water is elitist? People are dying. They are dying.
And Bernie Sanders —
Why did they leave us a planet which is so unhealthy and so on uninhabitable? Why did they allow more drought to take place, more flooding to take place? Why did they allow the sea levels to continue to rise?
I felt two visceral feelings. One was alarmism, and alarmism that paralyzes generations and people trying to fight the challenge. And I also felt like I was hearing radicalism. And it felt like we were throwing stupid paintings and blocking traffic but for no reason other than to get attention, really.
But I thought that was unnecessary, because as I’ve always said, I see the environment and climate is a great unifier among people of different backgrounds. And trying to over radicalize the problem, or cause fear, only puts us against each other. And none of those things had resonated with me.
[UPBEAT MUSIC]
One of the most frustrating, but also optimistic things about working in this world is that I’ve seen how much opportunity there is across party boundaries to get climate action. In a world where not that long ago, Republicans and Democrats worked together to solve these complex challenges, I believe we can do that again.
It’s clear that we need long-lasting reforms that work and stay across administrations, and you need conservatives to be at the table for that, because I believe inherently that nature is nonpartisan and that we can and will, we have to, make climate change and the environment nonpartisan again. In my lifetime, it’ll happen and we’re not too far off.
transcript
This transcript was created using speech recognition software. While it has been reviewed by human transcribers, it may contain errors. Please review the episode audio before quoting from this transcript and email transcripts@nytimes.com with any questions.
My name is Benji Backer. I’m the author of the “Conservative Environmentalist,” and the founder and chairman of the American Conservation Coalition.
[HIP MUSIC]
I’ve been a proud conservative since the age of 10. I’m 26 years old. But I’m not here today to defend my party’s stance on climate change. In fact, I actually think they put themselves on the wrong side of history in this fight. Over the last 16 years of my conservative political activism, I’ve grown increasingly frustrated about the role of conservative politics in fighting environmental challenges.
I spoke at a Tea Party rally in 2012. And I was standing there giving a speech about the importance of limiting government and markets, and it was probably the biggest speech I’d ever given at the time. And I was only a 14 or so years old.
And then I got off the stage, and the head of the Tea Party Organization nationally that invited me to speak, started talking about how everyone around me, all of my peers were buying into this crazy climate crisis and started making jokes about purposefully polluting to fight back against them. And I was immediately hopeless about where I was at in that very moment. And by the time I graduated high school, which was around the time Donald Trump ran for president, I started to realize that this problem was so much bigger than what I had originally thought.
So Obama’s talking about all of this with the global warming and the that. And a lot of it’s a hoax.
Back in the Ice Age, how much taxes did people pay? And how many changes did governments make to melt the ice?
Did woolly mammoths pay taxes?
You have senators bringing snowballs to the Senate floor to prove that so-called climate change doesn’t actually exist. You have political conservative influencers mocking climate activists, and making them out to all be these radical voices and highlighting the most radical ones to try to prove a political point.
It’d be nice if climate change alarmists would stop scaring the you-know-what out of our children by telling them that the world is going to end in a dozen years. It’s not.
We don’t hear very often, although this is changing, about what conservatives actually believe and what they would actually do about the problem. And that’s where we need to return to our roots, our environmental roots as conservatives, and change that narrative.
[SERENE MUSIC]
In the past, conservatives were actually the ones to prioritize climate change. We put together the first climate assessment in the United States, the National Climate Assessment. It was also a few decades ago when Republicans created the EPA under Richard Nixon, and the Clean Air Act, and the Clean Water Act.
It was under Ronald Reagan, where we were fighting the ozone problem with other countries around the world. And it was George H.W. Bush who set aside more public land than any other president in recent history. That is the Republican legacy on the environment. It’s not what we’ve heard over the last 10 years.
For almost all young Americans, who overwhelmingly believe climate change is real, including young conservatives, they see it as if you don’t care about climate change, and you don’t care about the environment, then you don’t care about me. And Republicans really risk losing an entire generation of voters this election and every election thereafter if they can’t get the narrative right, but also back it up with solutions and policies.
So what I’ve found to be the most successful in getting conservatives to act is an approach that rather than mandating people do or don’t use certain energy sources or vehicles or whatever, that we focus on incentives, and boosting people’s pocketbooks if they’re doing the right thing. An example of this is turning shuttering coal plants in rural West Virginia or Utah into nuclear reactor spaces, or solar fields, or wind turbine sites.
And while it’s transitioning to different energy sources, you’re not telling people that they can’t work there anymore, they can’t live there anymore, what car they should drive. In fact, you’re telling them, there’s just going to be a different energy source and you’re still going to be able to keep your job. And if their stake is included in the conversation, conservatives will be there right away.
People ask me all the time, Benji, why don’t you just join a liberal climate organization? Or why don’t you just become a Democrat? And the reality is, while I was frustrated about the right’s approach on climate change, I also felt very disappointed by the left’s approach on climate change, as I heard people like AOC —
You want to tell people that their concern and their desire for clean air and clean water is elitist? People are dying. They are dying.
And Bernie Sanders —
Why did they leave us a planet which is so unhealthy and so on uninhabitable? Why did they allow more drought to take place, more flooding to take place? Why did they allow the sea levels to continue to rise?
I felt two visceral feelings. One was alarmism, and alarmism that paralyzes generations and people trying to fight the challenge. And I also felt like I was hearing radicalism. And it felt like we were throwing stupid paintings and blocking traffic but for no reason other than to get attention, really.
But I thought that was unnecessary, because as I’ve always said, I see the environment and climate is a great unifier among people of different backgrounds. And trying to over radicalize the problem, or cause fear, only puts us against each other. And none of those things had resonated with me.
[UPBEAT MUSIC]
One of the most frustrating, but also optimistic things about working in this world is that I’ve seen how much opportunity there is across party boundaries to get climate action. In a world where not that long ago, Republicans and Democrats worked together to solve these complex challenges, I believe we can do that again.
It’s clear that we need long-lasting reforms that work and stay across administrations, and you need conservatives to be at the table for that, because I believe inherently that nature is nonpartisan and that we can and will, we have to, make climate change and the environment nonpartisan again. In my lifetime, it’ll happen and we’re not too far off.


Climate change is a deeply divisive issue in modern American politics, but that wasn’t always the case. Today, progressivism is often associated with environmental action, but not long ago the Republican Party equated conservatism with conservation.
In this audio essay, Benji Backer, an environmental activist and conservative author, argues that “we have to make climate change and the environment nonpartisan again.”
(A full transcript of this audio essay will be available within 24 hours of publication in the audio player above.)
Thoughts? Email us at theopinions@nytimes.com.
This episode of “The Opinions” was produced by Sophia Alvarez Boyd. It was edited by Kaari Pitkin and Alison Bruzek. Mixing by Sonia Herrero. Original music by Carole Sabouraud, Isaac Jones and Pat McCusker. Fact-checking by Mary Marge Locker. Audience strategy by Shannon Busta and Kristina Samulewski. Our executive producer is Annie-Rose Strasser.
The Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips. And here’s our email: letters@nytimes.com.
Follow the New York Times Opinion section on Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, WhatsApp, X and Threads.
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California gets federal funding for climate-ready workforce – Los Angeles Times

California is among nine U.S. states and territories selected to receive $60 million in federal funding as part of a significant effort to build a nationwide climate-ready workforce.
The investment from the U.S. Department of Commerce and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will support job development efforts in coastal and Great Lakes communities around the country, including $9.5 million to establish the Los Angeles County Climate Ready Employment Council at Long Beach City College.
The LBCC program will help develop training, internship and job placement services for occupations in the water and solar sectors that are demanding workers, officials said. Similar programs were announced Tuesday in American Samoa, Alaska, Washington, Texas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Ohio and Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
The investment in public, private and educational organizations “will train workers from around our coasts and help them find good-paying jobs that strengthen climate resilience and local economies,” read a statement from U.S. Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo. “Climate change accelerates the need for a new generation of skilled workers who can help communities address a wide range of climate impacts including sea level rise, flooding, water quality issues and the need for solutions such as renewable energy.”
Aggressive and impactful reporting on climate change, the environment, health and science.
The program is funded by President Biden’s landmark Inflation Reduction Act and includes $50 million in direct awards and $10 million in technical assistance to support the grantees. Federal officials told reporters they received 95 applications for the program requesting a total of $615 million in funding — or more than 10 times the amount available.
“Even with this generational investment that’s being made, we think it shows the need and the demand in communities nationwide for programs like this,” said Jonathan Pennock, director of NOAA’s National Sea Grant College Program, which is helping to manage the initiative.
Climate & Environment
Los Angeles, Sacramento, San Diego and other California communities will get $103 million in federal funding for tree planting and other green space efforts.
Sept. 18, 2023
The program arrives at a key moment for the country, which is continuing to experience worsening climate impacts such as extreme wildfires, floods, heat and storms. Las Vegas, Phoenix and Albuquerque are currently sweltering amid a record-breaking heat wave while portions of Florida are bracing to receive a month’s worth of rain in just a few days.
California has set ambitious targets for adapting to climate change, including cutting greenhouse gas emissions nearly in half by 2030 and achieving carbon neutrality by 2045, but to get there will require significant overhauls of its transportation and energy sectors, as well as upgrades and investments in manufacturing and infrastructure.
A 2021 study on California’s clean energy transition found that the investments needed to meet and strengthen the state’s goals could create 1 million new jobs through 2030. About 14% of those jobs are related to solar, 5% to onshore wind and 4% to wastewater, among other sectors.
Such efforts are urgently needed: In the 1980s, the U.S. averaged a billion-dollar weather disaster every four months, according to NOAA. Today, such events happen once every three weeks.
“It’s a stark reminder of the escalating risks we’re up against,” said Jainey Bavishi, assistant secretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere and a deputy NOAA administrator. “The demand for adaptation and resilience solutions is increasing, and with that comes an increasing demand for a climate-ready workforce that’s trained to help communities and businesses prepare for the effects of climate change.”
Bavishi noted that since 2018, the number of city- and state-level climate adaptation plans have risen by 32%, “but translating those into action fairly and effectively is proving to be tougher.” One barrier is the lack of a diverse skilled workforce, she said.
What’s more, the Fifth National Climate Change Assessment, released in November, underscored the ways in which historically underserved communities, communities of color, and tribal and indigenous communities face disproportionate risks and impacts from climate change. The same communities are often on the sidelines of the labor market as well.
The workforce initiative is intentionally reaching out to those communities with the training opportunities, Raimondo told reporters Tuesday. Support services — such as child care and transportation — are components of the initiative that will help ensure that “folks can finish the training, graduate and actually get high quality, good paying jobs.”
“We have to be clear-eyed about the need to prepare workers with skills for the jobs and connections to real jobs, and that’s what this initiative is designed to do,” she said.
Climate & Environment
Global average temperatures and CO₂ levels continue to soar. May was Earth’s 12th consecutive hottest month on record, officials announced this week.
June 5, 2024
The $9.5 million program at Long Beach City College represents the second-largest investment, following only the Greater Boston Coastal Resilience Jobs Alliance in Massachusetts, which will receive $9.8 million for a similar endeavor.
LBCC will serve as the “backbone” for the establishment of the Los Angeles County Climate Ready Employment Council — an expansive project that will convene parties from the public, private, nonprofit, tribal and educational spheres to improve the county’s climate resiliency workforce and develop training and job placement in all sectors across the county, college officials said.
“Although climate change repercussions may be inevitable, we still hold the power to lessen the severity of the outcomes by changing both our collective behavior and infrastructure,” read a statement from LBCC superintendent-president Mike Muñoz. “Our students will be at the forefront of developing and implementing innovative solutions that are essential for sustaining our planet’s health and ensuring a resilient future for all.”
LBCC this week also announced a $750,000 grant from the California Municipal Utilities Assn.’s water, wastewater and energy workforce development program. Both grants will “address the unique needs of those communities most disproportionately impacted by climate change and will connect underserved and under-resourced workers with training and job placement in climate-resilient careers,” school officials said.
The federal program will begin six to nine months after the funds are received, according to the college. NOAA officials said they aim to disperse all funds to awardees by Aug. 1.
The Biden administration has already created more than 270,000 clean energy jobs across the country, but officials underscored that there is still more work to be done.
“The impacts of the climate crisis are diverse, and the skills needed to empower workers and communities are also diverse,” Raimondo said. “If we’re going to ensure that American workers can take advantage of the jobs that we’re creating by tackling climate change, then we have to be proactive about training folks so they have the skills they need to get the jobs that are available.”
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Eugene School District 4J fined for environmental violations – KEZI TV

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EUGENE, Ore. – The Eugene School District 4J is facing a fine of more than $22,000 for environmental violations, according to a letter sent to the district by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality.
According to a notice sent to the school district on April 4, the DEQ documented several violations of policy during an August 2022 inspection of two underground storage tanks at the 4J Education Center and Sheldon High School. The storage tanks were being used to store diesel for emergency generators at the school buildings. However, the DEQ said their investigation found the tanks were installed without proper permits, and did not have any equipment to detect if the tanks were leaking.
The letter from the DEQ said that having proper leak detection equipment is essential to discovering leaks before fuel can contaminate the surrounding area. If a leak is not quickly detected, the fuels can have long-lasting harmful effects on the environment and human health.
The total fine leveled against the 4J school district was $22,256. The district was also required to ensure the underground storage tank at the Education Center was decommissioned within 60 days of the letter’s receipt. The Eugene 4J School District is expected to appeal the fine.
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Ecotourism in Canada – 10 Responsible Tourism Vacations – Travel2Next

How to experience responsible tourism in Canada
– This post may contain affiliate links. Read our disclosure.
Canada is renowned for its wide-open spaces which offer authentic eco-adventures. In the last few years, the concept of responsible tourism has become trendy but Canada’s ecotourism destinations have been a big drawcard for a long while. Here’s how to experience ecotourism in Canada.
Contents
The Ottawa River is a world-class white-water rafting river. While there are many super outfitters, only HorizonX offers full-moon rafting (June through August only) in Canada.
What’s cool? Silvery moonlight. Silhouettes of white pine.
Paddling your raft on slick, smooth river water, with HorizonX’s Martin Bertrand at the helm is a memorable way to experience ecotourism in Canada.
Suddenly, the sound of churning rapids becomes your world!
Expertly, Bertrand steers us to the top of the rapids. Back paddling, he shouts, “Ready? Paddle! Paddle hard!” and we’re off, skimming through moonlit, frothy whitewater.
What a rush!
Scott Cunningham’s Coastal Adventures introduced me to ocean kayaking along Nova Scotia’s Eastern shore – roughly a 75-minute drive east of Halifax.
His half-day excursion merely whetted my appetite.
What’s cool?
Paddle among a scatter of islands where seals and osprey (fish hawks) are your companions.
I loved the rugged, glacially scoured coastline juxtaposed against sandy beaches. Multi-day trips with kayak-camping are possible.
Recommended tour: Three Sisters Sea Kayaking Day Tour
Join Frontiers North’s Big 5 Safari, where you’ll travel with expert guides to try to glimpse and photograph Canada’s most sought-after wildlife: polar and black bears, belugas, moose and bison!
What’s cool? This two-part trip sees you wildlife watching in Riding Mountain National Park, three hours northwest of Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Boasting a rich, varied habitat where Canada’s boreal forest merges with aspen parkland and prairie grassland, this gem of a park offers spectacular wildlife watching, including a herd of bison.
Then, fly to Churchill, in the North Country, where you can kayak among thousands of beluga whales and board a Tundra Buggy to search for polar bears.
Ecotoruism Canada tip? Take binoculars.
Insider’s tip? Be ready to see (and photograph) Aurora Borealis.
Recommended tour: Tundra Buggy Summer Day Tours
Return to the Ordovician Era, over 510 million years ago, when Earth was covered by seas. Learn about this ancient period in geological time with a guided tour of Bonnechere Cave, Ontario’s most extensive cave system in the province’s Ontario’s Highlands region.
What’s cool? The cave has many stalactites and stalagmites, as well as fossils such as cephalopods (resembling squid), gastropods (ancient snails), and crinoids (ancestors of modern-day sea urchins).
The cave’s subdued electric light system allows you to see these features as well as your way through the caves, so there’s no need for flashlights.
You may also find year-round residents in the caves, sleeping upside-down, hanging from the ceiling.
Ecotourism Canada tip: Ontario’s Highlands’ offers many more recreational geology outings including digging for crystals and visiting mineral museums. It’s one of Canada’s lesser-known ecotourism gems.
Bison were central to the political, spiritual and cultural life of First Nations people who lived on the plains.
Bison jumps were crucial because using this hunting technique, animals were stampeded over a cliff to their deaths, then processed for the coming year’s food, shelter and clothing.
Visit Wanuskewin, see the jump, learn about First Nations spiritual connection to both the land and bison. Here you’ll gain insight into why many nations have gathered here for more than 6,000 years.
What’s cool? Wanuskewin is home to 19 pre-Contact archaeological sites which reveal more about First Nations’ use of, and life in, this part of Saskatchewan’s grasslands.
Canada ecotourism tip? Don’t miss guided hikes, view of an archaeological dig (in progress if you’re lucky) plus an exceptional gift store featuring locally made First Nations’ art and crafts.
Driving the Cowboy Trail circuit provides insight into Alberta’s “Old West”.
You’ll head south of Calgary through grasslands and foothills immediately east of the Rocky Mountains, discovering villages such as Bragg Creek and Black Diamond. However, there’s a triptych of historical destinations to experience:
Bar U Ranch National Historic Site explains the history of ranching.
Take a horse-drawn wagon ride to visit different outbuildings and enjoy a “cowboy coffee” (coffee boiled in a pot over a campfire).
Listen to cowboy poets recite poems – something ranch hands really did compose and recite while herding cattle over the grasslands, for months on end.
Continue to Waterton Lakes National Park where you can overnight in a teepee (and hear storytelling with First Nation Elders), pitch a tent, or stay in the 1926-27 Prince of Wales Hotel, a National Historic Site.
Hike, mountain bike, canoe or horseback ride (with Alpine Stables), to experience flora and fauna of pine and aspen forests, alpine meadows and marshland habitats.
What’s cool? Next is Head-Smashed-In-Buffalo-Jump, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Such jumps were used by ancient peoples who stampeded herds of plains bison over cliffs, so they could then process the animals into food, clothing and tools.
Archaeological research indicates people were here 6,000 years ago, meaning this is one of the oldest jumps in the world.
All in all, the Cowboy Trail connects us to ancient peoples, the environment, and European settlement: making a fascinating tour!
Recommended tour: Cowboy Country Tour
I love the paintings of Emily Carr, one of Canada’s most renowned painters who lived among First Nations and painted their villages, totem poles and way of life in the early 1900s.
Like her, I am intrigued with how First Nations lived – and still live – in rugged conditions such as British Columbia’s Haida Gwaii (used to be known as Queen Charlotte Islands).
My Canadian ecotourism travels have led me to explore the islands and touring a site Carr knew, called Skedans, with Moresby Explorers.
With them, I took a day’s boat trip to Louise Island and marvelled at seeing some of the exact totem poles she depicted.
What’s even more intriguing is that Haida Watchmen guard all the sacred sites, and interpret them to visitors.
Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve and Haida Heritage Site operated by Parks Canada is part of Haida Gwaii.
Just getting there is an adventure: go by air from Victoria or Vancouver, or hop on a BC Ferry from Prince Rupert.
As you approach, Pacific Ocean mists may swirl about Haida Gwaii or you may be dazzled by a blue-sky ocean day’s sheer glory.
What’s cool? Camp or stay in cabins to explore marine life in ocean pools, go beachcombing, and more.
Recommended tour: Cultural Immersion & Holistic Wellbeing on Haida Gwaii
Eco travels on horseback in Northern British Columbia Photo: Wayne SawchukAuthentic wilderness backcountry that’s accessible (albeit challenging to get to) is hard to come by, even in Canada.
Enter Northern BC’s Muskwa-Kechika Management Area, a 6.4 million hectare tract of land that’s about the size of Ireland.
This is an extremely special region in Canada, where resource extraction is highly monitored, with environmental protection being paramount.
It’s a fabulous destination for those wanting to experience responsible tourism in Canada.
How to best explore its sweeps of mountain ranges, broad valleys, and wild rivers? How best to photograph wildlife you may discover, such as grizzly or black bears, moose, elk, wolverine, wolves, Stone’s sheep and more?
Ride on horseback treks of up to 12 days with environmentalist, photographer and outfitter Wayne Sawchuk, owner-operator of Muskwa-Kechika Adventures.
He’s been leading trips throughout the summer for years, so knows the territory inside out. What’s key is participants must be fit and able to help catch and saddle their horses, through to pitching their tents and helping to cook at least one campfire dinner.
Sound like fun? It is. Sawchuk leads exhilarating rides that are somewhat demanding but spectacularly rewarding.
What’s cool? As you travel, he explains the geology, flora, fauna and First Nations culture. What’s not to love?
Hiking Newfoundland’s Gros Morne National Park is to walk amid elemental nature.
Think glacier-scoured rocks, deep-water fjords with plunging cliff sides and breathtaking ocean views. All these and more await.
The “more” includes spectacular geological features which reveal the Precambrian era of 1,200 million years ago.
With park interpreters, learn about plate tectonics, and find geological formations such as diabase dykes (such as at Western Brook Pond’s cliffs).
What’s cool? While hiking and camping here, you are exposed to the elements, just as my husband Eric and I were when we ventured to Gros Morne.
We were almost “swept away” by drenching rain and winds, however, another day shone brightly, and so just “wait five minutes” as the locals say, for a change in the maritime weather.
Imagine ocean kayaking a shoreline of red sandstone cliffs and then, in low tide, walking on the exposed ocean floor. This is simply “situation normal” at New Brunswick’s Bay of Fundy, home to the highest tides in the world.
How do the tides work? According to Parks Canada’s website, visit a few days in a row and you’ll notice the water is at its highest and lowest about an hour later each day.
The tides work on a ‘lunar’ or moon day, which is 24 hours and 52 minutes long. As the earth turns on its axis, the moon orbits in the same direction around the earth.
It takes one day and 52 minutes for a point on the earth to reappear directly beneath the moon.
Recommended tour: Best of Hopewell Rocks & Fundy National Park from Moncton
Rent A Car – Find the best car rental rates at Discover Cars. They compare car hire companies to provide you with the best deal right now.
Find A Hotel – If you’re curious about this article and are looking for somewhere to stay, take a look at these amazing hotels.

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Opinion: Sen. Romney should care about climate change – Deseret News

Thank you for the piece “Deficits vs. climate: Here’s what Sen. Romney thinks the Budget Committee should prioritize.” Although the regard for the federal budget deficit is appreciated, Sen. Mitt Romney’s concern is misplaced. Climate change is a primary issue and cannot be dismissed as a secondary matter, and diverting the conversation away from climate change is not beneficial to the budget committee or this deficit.
The principal focus on climate change and not covering its adverse effect is crucial to avoid future severe weather conditions, such as droughts, and to avoid increasing the already sizable $1.5 trillion deficit. Without the current interjection of climate change policy, a failure to mitigate its consequences only exacerbates the bearing of the financial burden on federal, state and local governments.
Investing in climate protection is economically sound, and we must implement new policies effectively. Solely shifting focus to less-expensive projects only provides temporary relief — equivalent to placing a Band-Aid on a bullet hole. Fortunately, forward progression is made possible by supporting the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act, which puts a price on carbon pollution and returns the money saved to households.
Supporting the implementation of climate change policy is essential to the future health of our environment and economy. The Budget Committee’s hearings on climate change are not a distraction but a necessary focus, and Utahns would appreciate for Romney to acknowledge this.
Aubrey Kennedy
Herriman

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Embracing Sustainability: The Rise of Eco-Friendly Venues in 2024 – LODGING Magazine

For the second year in a row, sustainability will be a defining factor in hospitality in 2024. Venues that prioritize sustainable initiatives will bring in more business, both from leisure travelers and group business. Even business travel managers are looking for ways to reduce the carbon footprint of their corporate travel programs, including choosing more eco-friendly accommodations.
Going green doesn’t have to include major renovations or changes to a venue’s basic structure—small changes can collectively make a big impact. Sustainability can also be achieved even when budgets are tight. The best place to start is with research and education. Cvent collaborated with internal data, insights gathered directly from event planners, and interviews with hoteliers to compile best practices for hospitality sustainability.
It can help to focus on the local community when building an eco-friendly program. Event planners looking to make greener choices will often opt for a venue that will make an impact on the immediate economy and community. Donating toiletries, food, and materials and reusing décor and signage can go a long way when improving sustainability—and attracting more event planners.
Planners are often looking for ways to be more sustainable, but with events at many different venues, they often need their venue partners to help in the process. When hotels can come armed with sustainable programs of their own, it’s a great added value for planners. Simple initiatives like recycling and donating food can be enough to establish a baseline of green day-to-day programs. Energy efficiency is another low-barrier-to-entry eco-friendly program that can make a difference in hotel operations.
While simple and easy programs are a start, venues that can afford to make larger-scale changes should take advantage of that. At the next level of investment, both in terms of cost and work required, are things like making menu changes, focusing on carbon offsetting, investing in new tech, and upcycling. F&B is an area where environmentally friendly tweaks can make quite an impact. Invest in reusable dishware for events, making the need to dispose of single-use plates and cups obsolete. Have the restaurant chef design menus that use local ingredients and don’t require many props, like syringes or plastic garnishes.
Carbon offsetting programs look to measure the carbon output for any given event—think air and ground travel, food, and energy use—and find ways to reduce carbon emissions to offset the event’s output. Often this is done by planting new trees or plants (there are companies that can facilitate the planting) that will remove carbon dioxide from the air, but it can also be done through investments in wind energy or agricultural projects.
Technology is constantly developing, especially in the eco-friendly area. As the technology improves, it becomes more available and cheaper for hotels and venues looking to invest. Solar panels are one common sustainable tech option. Keep an eye out for new and emerging technology, including automation and AI. Cvent eBooks and webinars are a great place to learn about what’s new in hospitality tech, as well as hospitality industry publications.
Upcycling is the practice of turning old goods into something new. It’s similar to recycling, hence the name, but requires the piece to be transformed in some way. If the hotel is swapping in new curtains, upcycling might see the old curtains repurposed as throw pillows for the lobby seating.
No matter what other measures a hotel or venue is taking to become more eco-friendly, it’s important to remember the golden rule of sustainability. Reducing consumption is the best and most effective option, whether for hospitality, other industries, or individuals. For venues, this might look like offering room maintenance on a less frequent schedule (a practice that has grown in popularity since the COVID-19 pandemic). For events, this could be reducing swag offerings—perhaps by providing guests an option of which, if any, swag they’d like to receive when they arrive.
For more information on these sustainable initiatives, case studies of successful green hotels and venues, interviews with sustainability experts, and more ways to run a venue with the environment in mind, look to Cvent’s recent eBook, The Ultimate Guide to Sustainable Meetings for Venues.
Sponsored by Cvent.

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